Grade 12 - Social Studies

American Government (Credit: 0.50)

American Government provides the student with the basic knowledge of the history and philosophy of the United States government, and the principles, which guide our democracy. The student examines the United States Constitution to answer questions and determine the facts of government. The course focuses on the functions and duties of the three branches of government, which are the legislative, executive, and judicial. Special attention is given to political participation, the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and government systems of the world. American Government uses the view of political institutions to explore the history, organization, and functions of the U.S. government. It offers students learning opportunities that build one on another. A goal of the course is for the student to develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a demanding and thoughtful academic setting. Students are encouraged to use their knowledge of the organizations and management of governing to develop their own views on current political issues. They are taught how to apply what they have learned into civic action. The course looks closely at the political knowledge and values of the country and gives students a look into the problems faced by presidents, congressional representatives, and other political activists. It also covers the roles of political parties, interest groups, and the media in shaping the government. The Supreme Court is presented as the Voice of Reason in the balance of powers. Students are encouraged to perform at higher levels as they are presented with historical documents and additional readings, work with a set of facts arranged by theme, and become skillful in note-taking.

American Government Honors (Credit: 0.50)

American Government Honors provides the student with the basic knowledge of the history and philosophy of the United States government, and the principles that guide our democracy. The student examines the United States Constitution to answer questions and determine the facts of government. The course focuses on the functions and duties of the three branches of government, which are the legislative, executive, and judicial. Special attention is given to political participation, the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and government systems of the world. American Government Honors references the view of political institutions to explore the history, organization, and functions of the U.S. government. It offers students learning opportunities that build one on another. A goal of the course is for the student to develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a demanding and thoughtful academic setting. Students are encouraged to use their knowledge of the organizations and management of governing to develop their own views on current political issues. Then the students are taught how to apply what they have learned into civic action. The course looks closely at the political knowledge and values of the country as it gives students a look into the problems faced by presidents, congressional representatives, and other political activists. It also covers the roles of political parties, interest groups, and the media in shaping the government. The Supreme Court is presented as the voice of reason in the balance of powers. Students are encouraged to perform at higher levels as they analyze historical documents and additional readings, work with a set of facts arranged by theme, become skillful in note taking, and join in student discussions. Students develop and demonstrate their writing skills by preparing extended research-based papers and through participation in community service.

AP US Government and Politics A (Credit: 0.50)

This course examines the U.S. political system. Students in this course will discuss political ideology, the development of the political system and democratic institutions. Students should, according to the College Board, gain an “analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States.” Furthermore, students will study “both the general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples” throughout history. The class discussion will require that students acquire a “familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics.” The main emphasis of the course, however, is to be able to apply a basic comprehension of the U.S. political system to contemporary events.

AP US Government and Politics B (Credit: 0.50)

This course examines the U.S. political system. Students in this course will discuss political ideology, the development of the political system and democratic institutions. Students should, according to the College Board, gain an “analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States.” Furthermore, students will study “both the general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples” throughout history. The class discussion will require that students acquire a “familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics.” The main emphasis of the course, however, is to be able to apply a basic comprehension of the U.S. political system to contemporary events.

AP World History: Modern A (Credit: 0.50)

The first semester of AP World History Modern delves into the history of mankind. Looking back to the prehistoric times, students will develop the connections between the early river valleys, the beginnings of civilizations, and governments. Through this semester, students will be introduced to concepts that will be placed on the AP examination, and will also be given multiple opportunities to practice skills necessary for the AP exam. This specific time will start from the First Agricultural Revolution to the Age of Exploration.

AP World History: Modern B (Credit: 0.50)

The second semester of AP World History Modern is a continuation of semester one, starting with how Europe evolved from the colonies being brought into the New World. This course will continue to make connections between nations and look at the big picture concepts of the world until present day. This semester will also spend one time preparing specifically for the AP exam. Through review materials and practicing skills needed for the AP exam, students will work on being prepared for the exam.

Economics (Credit: 0.50)

This course introduces the principles and the applications of economics in everyday life. Students develop an understanding of limited resources, and compare it with unlimited wants and needs. Students learn how individual and national economic decisions are made to allocate goods and services among competing users. Students apply economic principles to think and problem solve. The study of Economics uses the view of economic institutions and policies to explore the history, organization, and functions of the U.S. government in controlling our economy. It offers students learning opportunities that build one on another. A goal of the course is for the student to develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a demanding and thoughtful academic setting. Students are encouraged to use their knowledge of the policies and institutions of economics to develop their own views on current economic and monetary issues. They are taught how to apply what they have learned into personal financial activities. The course looks closely at the economic knowledge and values of the country and gives students a look into the problems faced by presidents, and congressional representatives. It also covers the roles of political activists, political parties, interest groups, and the media in shaping the U. S. economy. The Supreme Court is presented as the voice of reason in the balance of powers. Students are encouraged to perform at higher levels as they are presented with historical documents and additional readings, work with a set of facts arranged by theme, become skillful in note-taking, and join in student discussions. Students develop and demonstrate their writing skills by preparing extended research-based papers.

Economics Honors (Credit: 0.50)

Economics Honors provides the student with basic knowledge of the history and philosophy of the United States economy and the economic principles that guide our democracy. Students demonstrate problem solving, and their understanding of the processes for economic reasoning, by applying economic principles to decisions they make as consumers, workers, and members of local and larger societies. This, in turn, enables the student to understand the issues and public policies that affect economic, political, and cultural systems. The course focuses on the functions and duties of the three branches of government, which are the legislative, executive, and judicial as they relate to the economy. Special attention is given to the role of the Federal Reserve System in administering the United States economy.





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