Grade 11 - Social Studies

American History A - Semester 1 (Credit: 0.50)

This course covers the discovery, development, and growth of the United States. Major topics include; American Indian cultures, European colonization of the Americas, and the causes and effects of the American Revolution. Geographical, economic, and political factors are explores as the key factors in the growth of the United States of America. American History I is a survey of the struggle to build the United States of America from the colonial period to the beginning of the twentieth century. By means of reading, analyzing, and applying historical data, students come to appreciate the forces that shaped our history and character as an American people. Not only are the topics of American history discussed, but students also explore research methods and determine accurate sources of data from the past. Knowing the facts and dates of history are just the beginning: each student must understand how history affects him or her.

American History A Honors - Semester 1 (Credit: 0.50)

American History A Honors helps students learn the story of the founding of North America by Europeans in the 1600s. A prevailing theme of the course is that America accomplished tasks that no other country had undertaken before. America broke away from Europe, established its own country with a Constitution that has given freedom to more people than any other country in the world, and settled a country by putting that Constitution into practice. The course ends with a study of America's emergence as a world power at the beginning of the 20th Century. Students will encounter primary and secondary source document investigations, biographies of key individuals, political cartoons, map studies, and period literature.

American History B - Semester 2 (Credit: 0.50)

American History B begins with a study of American life before the 1929 Stock Market crash and how the Roaring Twenties influenced society in the late 19th through early 20th centuries. Students will examine the causes and consequences of the Great Depression and move on into a detailed study of World War II with an emphasis on America's role in the conflict. The course continues with an analysis of the Cold War struggle and America's rise as a superpower. The Civil Rights and Women's rights movements, pollution and the environment, and American domestic and foreign policy will be examined. The course wraps up with a summary of current events and issues, including a study of the Middle East. This course begins with an assessment of life in United States pre-World War I and ends with the conflicts of the new millennium. Students look at the nation in terms of economic, social, and political trends. The experiences of the last century are summarized, including a look into the civil rights issues that have embroiled the nation in conflict. The development of the United States of America into a superpower is explored within a global context.

American History B Honors - Semester 2 (Credit: 0.50)

American History B Honors begins in the 1920s Jazz Age and ends in the 21st Century. Students will examine economic factors that lead to the Great Depression and World War II. The West's involvement in the Cold War, as well as the fall of the Soviet Union, will be covered in detail. America's rise as a world power is featured. The final unit of the course includes a study of the environment, modern presidential foreign and domestic policies, and the Middle East. Unit 30 includes a lesson designed to help students prepare for the final exam.

AP US Government and Politics A (Credit: 0.50)

This course examines the U.S. political system. Students in this course will discuss political ideology, the development of the political system and democratic institutions. Students should, according to the College Board, gain an “analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States.” Furthermore, students will study “both the general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples” throughout history. The class discussion will require that students acquire a “familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics.” The main emphasis of the course, however, is to be able to apply a basic comprehension of the U.S. political system to contemporary events.

AP US Government and Politics B (Credit: 0.50)

This course examines the U.S. political system. Students in this course will discuss political ideology, the development of the political system and democratic institutions. Students should, according to the College Board, gain an “analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States.” Furthermore, students will study “both the general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples” throughout history. The class discussion will require that students acquire a “familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics.” The main emphasis of the course, however, is to be able to apply a basic comprehension of the U.S. political system to contemporary events.





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