Grade 9 - Science

Biology A - Semester 1 (Credit: 0.50)

Biology A introduces students to the scientific method and the major concepts of biology from an historical and practical viewpoint. The three major themes of this course are the cell, the molecular basis of heredity, and the interdependence of organisms. Students who take this class will have a deeper appreciation for the complexities of living organisms. Life on this planet, unlike anywhere else in the observable universe, is complex and highly organized. Whether examining life on the molecular or the planetary level, it exhibits a highly organized structure that inspires awe by its genius and complexity. In the last 50 years, discoveries have launched new branches of biology that have transformed the daily routine, from conception to death. New challenges await, such as the current crisis in ecology, global warming, and the resurgence in viral disease. To make rational choices in the 21st century, the citizen must have a basic understanding of biological concepts and the reasoning behind them. Biology A is presented in a multimedia format using interactive modules, labs, narrated animation, text, and videos to present the study of life on this planet. Students work through and complete several self-check activities and quizzes for practice, and participate in self-reflection. In each unit, students complete the unit exam and deliver a unit project.

Major Concepts:

Cellular Processes
Molecular Basis of Heredity
Interdependence of Organisms
Contagious Diseases-Causes and Cures
Human Populations and Their Impact on the Environment

Biology A Honors - Semester 1 (Credit: 0.50)

The science of biology must begin with cell theory, including the structure, function, and chemistry of the cell. Cells form the primary level of organization of all living things. The chemistry and function of each cell shapes the lifestyle of the organism, from feeding to reproductive patterns. This first course in biology focuses on the life of the cell, dealing with issues of structure, transport, genetics, protein synthesis, energy production, and usage. The tools of science are explained and then focused on the living systems in the cell. In the case of genetics, the molecular behavior of DNA is elaborated to show how it determines the visible traits of the organism and population. Thus, you are led on a tour of living systems from the tiniest to the broadest levels of organization. During this tour, you will employ text, computer simulations, videotaped labs, and hands-on investigation to verify each concept and make them relevant to what you see each day. The aim of this course is to guide you, the student, to see your world in biological terms, and then to expand your vision to contemplate current topics in biological research and application.

Major Concepts:

Science of Life
Biochemistry and the Cell
The Carbon Cycle
Cellular Reproduction
Protein Synthesis
Genetics and Humans

Biology B - Semester 2 (Credit: 0.50)

Biology B is a continuation of the basic course in biology, Biology A. The major concepts covered are population dynamics and evolution. Students explore population dynamics through the study of mutualism, predation, parasitism, and competition. The theory of evolution is presented, along with the many evidences and details that make evolution the backbone of modern biology. From biochemistry to evolution, biology fascinates people. Biochemists first astounded the world by showing that life obeys the same chemical principles as all creation, but that life engineers chemistry to its own needs. Decades later, Darwin shocked the world by suggesting that life evolves according to the conditions of the environment it inhabits. Evolution, often debated and derided, has survived to become a key concept of biology. This second course in biology examines the wonder of life and its mechanisms. Students work through and complete several self-check activities and quizzes for practice, and participate in self-reflection. In each unit, students complete the unit exam and deliver a unit project.

Major Concepts:

Biochemistry of Nutrition
Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration
Genetic Adaptability
Taxonomy and Speciation
Nutrient Cycles and Adaptations to the Environment
Energy Flow and Ecosystems

Biology B Honors - Semester 2 (Credit: 0.50)

The study of the human body involves more than just its anatomy, but also entails an understanding of the roles each part plays, how each contributes to system, and holistic wellness. The basic plan of the course is to examine each of the organ systems, including the skeletal, muscular, integumentary (skin), circulatory, respiratory, immune, digestive, excretory, nervous, sensory, endocrine, and reproductive systems. The regulation and coordination of these systems is what constitutes physiology, which is the major part of the laboratory investigations associated with the course. After completing the course, students will have a foundation for more specialized studies in the health sciences.

Major Concepts:

Bones, Muscles and Skin
Heart, Blood and Lungs
Staying Healthy, Eating Well
Digestion, Excretion and Nerve Transmission
Mechanisms of Control
Reproduction

Earth Science A - Semester 1 (Credit: 0.50)

The first three modules of Semester 1 cover Scientific Inquiry, the Structure and Composition of the Universe, and the Features of the Solar System. Students learn the importance of scientific inquiry and how to communicate the results of scientific investigations. They then have material on the formation of the universe, including the Big Bang Theory, the motions of celestial objects, and stellar evolution. The third module covers material related to the Solar System, including features of the Sun and the planets and the movements of Earth. The second three modules of Semester 1 cover Weather, Climate, and Earth’s Water Cycle. Students first learn in Module 4 about the atmosphere and clouds, as well as the factors that influence local and global climate. In Module 5 they continue by learning about weather and air masses, meteorology and storms. Module 6 then discusses the water cycle, including groundwater and ocean features, as well as water scarcity and pollution.

Major Concepts:

Scientific Inquiry includes all the skills and characteristics that scientists need to develop new knowledge.
The universe formed after expansion of very hot, very dense material.
The universe is expanding.
Stars are giant nuclear reactors that transform matter into energy.
The bodies of the Solar System move in predictable ways under the influence of gravity.
Temperature and pressure differences in the atmosphere create distinct global and local climate patterns.
Warm fronts and cold fronts interact with air masses differently to produce predictable weather.
Wind blows on a global scale in wind belts known as the easterlies, westerlies, and trade winds.
Scientists help society predict and prepare for storm hazards.
The water cycle moves Earth’s water between land and the atmosphere.

Earth Science B - Semester 2 (Credit: 0.50)

The first three modules of Semester 2 cover the physical structure of the Earth and Earth’s tectonic system, including the rock cycle, tectonic activity, and mountain building. It then covers weathering and erosion and soil formation. The next material in the course then addresses the concept of systems; it addresses the Earth as a system, feedback in systems, and Earth’s major nutrient cycles. The second three modules of Semester 2 cover geologic history, including the evolution of Earth’s atmosphere, the geologic time scale, and the fossil record. It then goes over natural resources and the effects of human population on natural resources. The course wraps up with a discussion of human society and its interconnectedness with the Earth’s environment, how science and technology work together, and the technological design process in earth science applications.

Major Concepts:

The Earth formed 4.65 billion years ago.
The fossil record provides evidence of an ancient Earth.
Different types of rocks form in different environments, and they have predictable properties.
Earth’s tectonic system affects features of Earth’s surface as well as earthquake and volcanic activity.
Geologic history is divided into distinct chunks of time and organized in the geologic time scale.
Fossil fuels are nonrenewable energy sources.
Renewable energy sources include hydropower, wind power, solar power, and geothermal power.
Urbanization is taking place at a higher rate than ever and will have impacts on the environment.
Science and technology work together to advance our understanding and develop new knowledge.
The technological design process is an orderly process of steps for applying technology to solve problems.

Physical Science A - Semester 1 (Credit: 0.50)

This is an introduction to the Physical Sciences and scientific methodology. The objectives are to impart a basic knowledge of the physical properties and chemistry of matter. Skills are developed in the classroom, and reinforced through homework reading, and interesting labs that relate to everyday life.

Major Concepts:

Energy
Force
Newton's Laws
Machines
Waves
Light

Physical Science B - Semester 2 (Credit: 0.50)

This is an introduction to the Physical Sciences and scientific methodology. The objectives are to impart a basic knowledge of the physical properties and chemistry of matter. Skills are developed in the classroom, and reinforced through homework reading, and interesting labs that relate to everyday life.

Major Concepts:

Lenses
Electricity
Matter
Modern Machines
Physical Science and the Environment





Enroll Now